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In this week’s edition we have news of an impending major miscarriage of justice due to use of unaccredited forensic services, a proposed Bill could plug serious gaps in existing stalking laws, and London’s police and crime committee has warned a new strategy could be needed to respond to changing trends in gun crime. Features this week include a look at whether forces have lost the skills to address a potential rise in metal theft, Kenny MacAskill argues that senior leaders from England have always been welcomed in Police Scotland, we explore the new popularity and impact of Xanax and examine whether offenders are evading justice by learning from television series. Also, Professor Colin Rogers evaluates the possibility that algorithms could introduce bias into decision making, and the Research Inspector looks at information from a number of definitive studies to find out ‘what works’ for the front line.

Jan 24, 2018

In this week’s edition we have news of an impending major miscarriage of justice due to use of unaccredited forensic services, a proposed Bill could plug serious gaps in existing stalking laws, and London’s police and crime committee has warned a new strategy could be needed to respond to changing trends in gun crime. Features include: A gift that keeps giving As the Scottish government stands accused of racism over the treatment of the Police Scotland chief constable, Kenny MacAskill argues that senior police leaders from England have always been welcomed but warns that the furore is likely to continue. Taking the lead Successful action, combined with new legislation and falling commodity prices, led to metal theft dropping down force priorities, however, as prices have risen and dealers find ways around the law, Police Professional asks whether forces have lost the skills to address the issue now it is on the rise again. It’s a rap hit Alerts have been issued across the country to the emergence of a highly addictive new ‘drug of choice’ for the young based on its use among popular rappers. Police Professional reports on Xanax’s new popularity and its impact on users. Risk formulas Professor Colin Rogers examines whether the use of algorithms in decision-making could unintentionally introduce bias into assessments of risk and predicting future offending. What is ‘What Works’? This week the Research Inspector looks at the information available, in summary and detail, from definitive studies in major areas of policing for use by frontline officers and staff. Just a drama? Following numerous attempts to commit crimes by using what they learnt from fictional television series, research has shown whether offenders really have evaded justice as a result of what they watched. To view the edition click here

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