Scotland plans national framework for mobile workstation client devices

The Scottish government is tendering for a national framework to provide fixed and mobile workstation client devices and associated services to public sector organisations, including the emergency services and the Scottish Police Authority.

Dec 9, 2015
By Paul Jacques

The Scottish government is tendering for a national framework to provide fixed and mobile workstation client devices and associated services to public sector organisations, including the emergency services and the Scottish Police Authority.

Scheduled to last for up to four years, the proposed single supplier agreement, valued at between £5 million and £10 million, is the latest in a number of procurement exercises undertaken by Scottish authorities this year to replace outgoing agreements to meet the public sector’s need for devices.

It is part of a wider National Client Device (NCD) programme. Scotland has already launched a number of other single supplier framework tenders this year for desktop client devices, cloud computing and proprietary client devices and mobile devices. A further tender for tablet devices is expected early next year.

The agreements form part of the Scottish government’s Digital Public Services Strategy, which is designed to provide high-quality end-point devices to help meet environmental and energy-efficiency goals.

Supporting this is the Digital Strategy for Justice in Scotland, designed to provide a modern, user-focused justice system that uses digital technology to deliver simple, fast and effective justice and value for money.

Police Scotland has already started to integrate the ICT systems of the eight legacy police forces under its i6 programme and hopes to be operating a single secure ICT network by the end of 2016, allowing it to operate more effective digital systems in-force and improving information sharing with other justice organisations.

The i6 programme is the largest and most significant transformational change programme ever undertaken by the service, bringing together more than 100 of the legacy Scottish forces’ systems to free up more time for frontline policing. It is expected to cover 80 per cent of core operational activity lying at the heart of volume priority policing, broadly grouped under six strands: crime, vulnerable persons, criminal justice, custody, missing persons and productions and property.

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