Delayed MOT database now complete

The MOT database that aims to take illegal and dangerous cars off the roads is now live, having been installed in all 18,500 MOT test centres.

Apr 21, 2006
By David Howell
Sergeant Matiu Ratana

The MOT database that aims to take illegal and dangerous cars off the roads is now live, having been installed in all 18,500 MOT test centres.

MOT garages have been equipped with ruggedised notebook PCs complete with printer and modem. The testers are authenticated with a smart card and password. MOT details are sent securely over the Internet to the MOT database. Once on the database the information can be accessed by Vosa staff and the DVLA. The police will also be able to use the database in conjunction with the number plate recognition system. Vosa stated that they would soon be able to provide the police with a complete database of vehicles without a valid MOT.

The Vehicle and Operator Services Agency (Vosa) awarded the contract worth £230m to build and implement the system to Siemens Business Services.

Alex Fiddes, director of the private vehicles sector at Vosa, told silicon.com: “We will be able to eliminate people fraudulently issuing MOT certificates.” Fiddes admitted that there had been some delays as the new database was scheduled to go live three years ago, but commented: “This is not a simple IT system and we said we would not rush to meet artificially imposed milestones.”

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