Cybercrime world’s ‘most dangerous criminal threat’

The first Interpol Information Security Conference, co-hosted last week
by the world police body and Hong Kong Police, aimed to provide law
enforcement representatives, industry leaders and academic experts
worldwide a platform to collectively address the issue of today’s
critical security challenges

Sep 23, 2010
By Paul Jacques
Graeme Biggar

The first Interpol Information Security Conference, co-hosted last week by the world police body and Hong Kong Police, aimed to provide law enforcement representatives, industry leaders and academic experts worldwide a platform to collectively address the issue of today’s critical security challenges

Interpol’s Secretary General has warned that cybercrime may be one of the most dangerous criminal threats the world has ever faced. In his keynote address at last week’s three-day Interpol Information Security Conference (September 15-17), entitled ‘Global Cooperation today for InfoSec risks tomorrow’, Ronald K Noble called for law enforcement worldwide to develop an international identity verification system to combat “the very concrete security threat” of cybercrime.

“Considering the anonymity of cyberspace, cybercrime may in fact be one of the most dangerous criminal threats ever. A vital component in fighting transnational crime must, therefore, include the policing of information security and the provision of secure communication channels for police worldwide based on common standards,” said Mr Noble.

He added: “Our world is increasingly connected and networked and therefore also increasingly vulnerable to disruptions caused by intrusions and cyber attacks. I am not just talking about today’s two billion Internet users, but also about what we call the ‘Internet of things’, that is, the 35 billion devices that are connected to the Internet and access real-time data.

“The scope of what needs to be protected, which today spans from email to mobile phones, digital cable to airplane navigation, online shopping to medical records, is likely to considerably expand in the years to come. Tomorrow’s world would then become a ‘thinking planet’, a gigantic web of interconnected individuals and devices in which our growing dependence upon connected technology will give cyber criminals a much greater potential for high-impact attacks.”

Mr Noble said crimes such as identity theft and denials of service already cause significant harm to individuals and businesses. Research from e-security specialist McAfee estimated that data theft and breaches from cybercrime may have cost businesses as much as $1 trillion globally in lost intellectual property and expenditures for repairing the damage for 2008 alone.

He also revealed that cyber criminals had recently stolen his identity on Facebook in a bid to obtain sensitive information on Interpol cases.

“Just recently, Interpol’s Information Security Incident Response Team discovered two Facebook profiles attempting to assume my identity as Interpol’s Secretary General. One of the impersonators was using this profile to obtain information on fugitives targeted during our recent Operation Infra Red, which led to more than 130 arrests in 32 countries.”

Bill Conner, president and CEO of Entrust (provider of identity-based security solutions), explained:

“Two of the globe’s biggest threats centre around border security and large-scale online fraud. And while they affect different audiences, it’s important for law enforcement agencies to be properly armed with the tools, ideas and strategies to properly fight all methods of identity theft, online fraud and other nefarious crimes.”

Entrust helped to produce the multi-purpose global e-Identification smart card currently being trialled by Interpol, which provides its officers with secure access to Interpol networks, data and restricted buildings, as well as unimpeded border crossings and secure communication from virtually any fixed or mobile location in the world.

“It will enable Interpol to control access to resources, prevent theft of information and comply with privacy and digital signature regulations and laws on a global basis,” said Mr Conner. 

Mr Noble said Interpol’s vision was that one day, all law enforcement officials worldwide involved in international policing matters would be equipped with this e-Identifica

Related News

Copyright © 2022 Police Professional