BWV to protect frontline workers

A report by the Greater London Authority (GLA) Conservatives, Risky Business: Protecting Frontline Workers from Attack Whilst On Duty, says that body-worn video (BWV) cameras could dramatically cut the number of crimes against frontline workers, such as transport workers, doctors, nurses and ambulance crews.

Oct 29, 2014
By Paul Jacques
Reported e-scooter user casualties, by sex and age, Great Britain: year ending June 2021.

A report by the Greater London Authority (GLA) Conservatives, Risky Business: Protecting Frontline Workers from Attack Whilst On Duty, says that body-worn video (BWV) cameras could dramatically cut the number of crimes against frontline workers, such as transport workers, doctors, nurses and ambulance crews.

Using data collated from Freedom of Information requests, the report found that almost 66,000 frontline workers suffered physical or verbal attacks in the past three years, including more than 23,000 ‘attacks’ against police officers and police community support officers. UK Rail staff were subjected to 6,045 physical or verbal attacks and Tube staff 7,435. Five bus drivers are attacked in London every day.

GLA Conservative crime spokesperson Roger Evans said video evidence “would make it easier to report crimes, avoid disputes and shorten trials”.

“Body-worn cameras provide an effective deterrent against abuse and attack, helping to increase health and safety for staff and members of the public and improve welfare, performance and staff turnover rates,” he added.

The report says the cost of a roll-out of 100 body-worn cameras to frontline workers, with similar technology to that used by Staffordshire Police, would be £66,000 – approximately half the average annual cost of sick days due to assault.

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