APCC chair reflects on five years since first PCC election

The chair of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC) has urged the Government to protect the policing budget as he reflects on the five years since police and crime commissioners (PCCs) were introduced.

Nov 15, 2017

The chair of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners (APCC) has urged the Government to protect the policing budget as he reflects on the five years since police and crime commissioners (PCCs) were introduced. Hertfordshire PCC David Lloyd called for real terms protection for the police service, which he believes is essential “at a time when the nature of crime is changing rapidly, and we continue to face the terrible threat of international and domestic terrorism”. He said PCCs are crucial in making the reality of policing clear to the decision makers in Parliament, including the issue of police funding. “PCCs have always been resolutely focused on reform and efficiency, both locally and nationally,” Mr Lloyd added. “PCCs have led the way on sharing back-office functions to drive down costs, allowing for far greater investment in front-line services than would otherwise have been possible. “Through our representation on the new National Commercial Board we will continue to be strong advocates for greater progress in collaborative procurement, shared services and estates in every force area.” Mr Lloyd also highlighted the work PCC’s have done towards the collaboration of the police and fire services, as the Policing and Crime Act 2017 allowed Essex PCC Roger Hirst to become the UK’s first police, fire and crime commissioner. “I look forward to reflecting on the progress he and others have made on this agenda in five years’ time.” He added: “Earlier this year, the introduction of the Policing and Crime Act further aided PCCs by placing a duty to collaborate on police, fire and ambulance services. “Put simply, collaboration is supporting emergency services to deliver effective and efficient responses to shared risks and public demand, and with continued support this will spark further opportunities for improvement, so we can all deliver the best possible public service.” PCCs also pressed the Government to change the police misconduct regime, which led to the reforms introduced in the Policing and Crime Act. “Under these reforms, PCCs will have the opportunity to play a far greater role, whether by providing a consistent point of contact for complainants, managing the appeals process locally or ensuring the swift resolution of complaints which fall outside the formal police misconduct system,” Mr Lloyd said.

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